Ultraviolet (UV) Air Purifiers

What is an ultraviolet (UV) air purifier?

There are a variety of ultraviolet (UV) air purifiers available on the market today. Most commonly, UV is used to complement HEPA or other forms of filtration to enhance an air purifiers capacity to sterilize or remove harmful microorganisms like bacteria and viruses. UV is also used on a standalone basis within furnace ducts to sterilize microorganisms.

Ultraviolet (UV) lamps produce UV-C or "germicidal UV" radiation of a much greater intensity than sunlight. Almost all of a UV lamp's output is concentrated in the 254 nanometers (nm) region in order to take full advantage of the germicidal properties of this wavelength. When organisms are exposed to UV light, the light enters the cell wall and alters its DNA, effectively sterilizing it. When UV light of a strong enough intensity is used, it can actually break down the chemical bonds in organic molecules, often removing organic gases from the air. In fact, recent testing has shown that UV can be effective at destroying certain VOC's, although we would not specifically recommend the technology for VOC reduction at this time. The science behind the effectiveness of ultraviolet light in sterilizing bacteria and viruses as well as other microorganisms is extremely well documented and proven conclusively. In fact, the use of UV light to sterilize water, especially in residential well water applications, is extremely common.

What contaminants do ultraviolet (UV) air purifiers remove?

Ultraviolet air purifiers are designed exclusively to sterilize bacteria and viruses and other harmful microorganisms. UV us one of the few safe, effective technologies for this category of contaminants. UV air purifiers will not remove dust, odors, or most common allergens. For this reason, they are usually combined with other air purification technologies such as HEPA and activated carbon.

Dust Mites
Dust
Mites
poor
poor
Mold Spores
Mold
Spores
fair
fair
Pollen

Pollen
poor
poor
Pet Dander
Pet
Dander
poor
poor
Tobacco Smoke
Tobacco
Smoke
poor
poor
Chemicals & VOCs
Chemicals
& VOCs
poor
poor
General Odors
General
Odors
poor
poor
Bacteria / Viruses
Bacteria/
Viruses
excellent
excellent

Benefits of Ultraviolet (UV) Air Purifier Technology

Negatives of Ultraviolet (UV) Air Purifier Technology

What to Look for in an Ultraviolet (UV) Air Purifier

The effectiveness of a UV air purifier is dependent upon the exposure time between the contaminant and the UV light. UV is most effective when the air is free of dust and particulate (which can block some of the UV light), so HEPA pre-filtration is highly recommended. A UV sterilizer with a high air processing rate is also desirable as it will ensure multiple air passes per hour to enhance the overall exposure time.

Recommended HEPA Filter Brands / Models that use Supplemental UV Treatment:

Airpura UV600
Airpura
UV600

US$749.98
microorganisms

Get More Details on Airpura UV600
Dust

Dust
excellent
excellent
Dust Mites
Dust
Mites
excellent
excellent
Mold Spores
Mold
Spores
very good
very good
Pollen

Pollen
very good
very good
Pet Dander
Pet
Dander
very good
very good
Tobacco Smoke
Tobacco
Smoke
good
good
Chemicals & VOCs
Chemicals
& VOCs
very good
very good
General Odors
General
Odors
very good
very good
Bacteria / Viruses
Bacteria/
Viruses
good
good
Radon

Radon
good
good

Airpura P600
Airpura
P600 / P600+

Starting at:
US$1149.98

photocatalytic
oxidation


Get More Details on Airpura P600
Dust

Dust
excellent
excellent
Dust Mites
Dust
Mites
excellent
excellent
Mold Spores
Mold
Spores
very good
very good
Pollen

Pollen
very good
very good
Pet Dander
Pet
Dander
very good
very good
Tobacco Smoke
Tobacco
Smoke
very good
very good
Chemicals & VOCs
Chemicals
& VOCs
excellent
excellent
General Odors
General
Odors
excellent
excellent
Bacteria / Viruses
Bacteria/
Viruses
good
good
Radon

Radon
good
good